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Category Archives: New Food

Categories Advice, Diet, food, New Food, nutrition, summer, Wellness

Know about Basil or Sabza or Tukmaria seeds

Sabja seeds, or basil seeds call them by any name, but including these magic seeds can be very healthy for your body. Usually consumed after soaking it in water, two teaspoons have only 40 calories but is very nutrient dense.

It is low-carb and high in protein, which is a rare combination in most vegetarian sources of food, The fibre will keep you feeling satiated long and ensure that you do not end up eating again. As a result, you end up eating lower calories and can potentially lose weight.

Sabja seeds have about 11gm of proteins, 5gm of carbs and 2gm of fibre, which makes it the perfect mix for weight loss. Sabja seeds contain oil components, which comprises of 50% linoleic acid, 22% linolenic acid, 15% oleic acid and 8% unsaturated fatty acids. It is also a good source of omega 3 and 6 fatty acids. This means it has anti inflammatory properties.

How to use?

The simplest thing you can do is soak two teaspoons of sabja seeds in water and drink it every day. “They can also be added to sherbets, falooda, smoothies for added benefits,”

Sabja seeds have always been used in Ayurveda largely due to its medicinal properties. It has a cooling effect on our body. It has also been used to treat conditions such as depression, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and metabolic imbalances.

When soaked in water, the seeds absorb water and increase in size, which in turn increases the fibre content. It has a mild flavour and it can also be mixed with yogurt. Make sure to allow at least 10-15 minutes for it to swell up.

“Basil seeds also offer benefits in preventing weight gain in people with metabolic syndrome. Animal studies have shown that consumption of basil seed extract may delay the development of insulin resistance and shows promise in treatment of diabetes. Basil seeds’ high fibre content likely slows digestion to prevent spikes in blood sugar, and subsequently the hormone insulin, following meals,”

Thus, basil seeds or sabja seeds can safely be added to your diet. However, just eating these seeds won’t lead to weight loss. You need to add some more diet tweaks and workout in order to lose weight.

 

 

A word of caution. Children and pregnant women should avoid consuming sabja seeds. Young kids could choke on these seeds, if they are not mixed well with water. In case of pregnant women, these seeds are known to lower down the levels of estrogen in the body. It is best to consult your doctor if you’re pregnant or suffering from any other ailments before adding sabja seeds to your diet.

Categories Advice, Diet, food, meal palnning, New Food, nutrition, Protein, Wellness

How to Grow Broccoli Sprouts at Home

What’s so special about broccoli sprouts? According to various researchers (including Johns Hopkins and Ohio State University), they contain 1,000 percent more nutrients than mature broccoli!

Sulforaphane, the prominent phytochemical in broccoli, combats cancer on several fronts − including removal of carcinogens, prevention of cancer cell production, destruction of breast cancer cells, and tumor reduction. These small plants are in the cancer research limelight for their unique ability to exert 50 times the amount of cancer fighting power of broccoli.

Sprouts are easily absorbed into the system because they also contain potent digestive enzymes.

Ingredients

2 tbsp broccoli sprout seeds.

Filtered water

Instructions

  • Add 2 tablespoons of broccoli sprouting seeds to a widemouthed quart jar.
  • Cover with a few inches of filtered water and cap with the sprouting lid.
  • Store in a warm, dark place overnight.
  • The next morning, drain the liquid off and rinse with fresh water. Be sure to drain all the water off.
  • Repeat this 3-4 times a day. Continue to store your seeds in a warm, dark place. After a few days, the seeds will start to break open and grow.

  • Eventually, the sprouts will be an inch or so long and have yellow leaves. Now you can move the sprouts out into the sunlight.
  • Continue to rinse them 3-4 times a day until the leaves are dark green. Now they are ready to eat!
  • This whole process will take about a week. Patience is key!
  • Once they are ready, replace the sprouting lid with a standard mason jar lid and store in the refrigerator.
  • Serve on top of salads, stirred into soups, or however strikes your fancy.
Categories Advice, Diet, Fitness, food, Health, meal palnning, New Food, nutrition, Protein, Wellness

Why everyone should eat Chia Seeds?

Weight loss can be a major challenge today because of the abundance of food available and a more sedentary.

But inthis modern-day superfood that is native to South America can help you with weight loss in a healthy way . In older times, chia seeds were a staple in Mayan and Aztec diets, but later got banned due to their ritualistic religious use. Needless to say, these seeds have made a comeback with a bang in the market due to their positive connection with weight loss.

When you think of chia seeds, you most likely think of the tiny seeds that were the joke of a generation as we slathered them on clay sculptures and gleefully watched the sprouting of ‘green hair’ on Homer Simpson and porcupines.uhh..now let us go keen on them, Chia seeds are rich in fibre and thus eating them in between your meals not only stops you from bingeing but also helps you eat less in your next meal.

Chia is the edible seed of Salvia hispanica, a flowering plant in the mint family.

The seeds are hydrophilic, absorbing up to 12 times their weight in liquid when soaked and developing a mucilaginous coating that gives chia-based creams and beverages a distinctive gel texture.

Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)

Energy – 486 kcal (2,030 kJ)

Carbohydrates -42.1 g

Dietary fiber-34.4 g

Fat-30.7 g

Protein-16.5 g

 

Chia seeds on average contain 6% water, 42% carbohydrates, 16% protein, and 31% fat. The fatty acids in chia seeds are highly unsaturated, with the major fats being linolenic acid (50–57% of total fat) and linoleic acid (17–26%). The seeds are rich in omega-3 fatty acids and the B vitamins thiamin and niacin.

Ground or whole chia seeds are used in Argentina, Bolivia, Guatemala, Mexico, and Paraguay for nutritious drinks and food.

Chia seeds may be sprinkled or ground up on top of other foods. Chia seeds can also be mixed into smoothies, breakfast cereals, energy bars, granola bars, yogurt, tortillas, and bread. They can be soaked in water and consumed directly or mixed with any kind of juice or milk.

Categories Advice, food, Health, meal palnning, New Food, nutrition, Protein

Flax Seeds

Is flax seed the new wonder food?

Some call it one of the most powerful plant foods on the planet. There’s some evidence it may help reduce your risk of heart disease, cancer, stroke, and diabetes. That’s quite a tall order for a tiny seed that’s been around for centuries.

Flax seed was cultivated in Babylon as early as 3000 BC. In the 8th century, King Charlemagne believed so strongly in the health benefits of flax seed that he passed laws requiring his subjects to consume it. Quite interesting. curious to know more about this tiny tot. here you are

Nutrition:

  • Flax seeds contain 534 calories per 100 grams, corresponding to 55 calories for each tablespoon of whole seeds (10 grams).
  • They consist of 42% fat, 29% carbs and 18% protein.
  • The net digestible carbs are only 1.5 grams for every 100 grams of seeds, making flax seeds a low-crab friendly food. Two tablespoons of flax seeds provide about six grams of fiber. This is roughly 15–25% of the daily recommended intake for men and women, respectively Soluble fiber helps regulate blood sugar and cholesterol levels. It also promotes digestive health by feeding the beneficial bacteria in the digestive system When mixed with water, the mucilage gums in flax seeds become very thick. This, combined with the insoluble fiber content, makes flax seeds a natural laxative.
  • Consuming flax seeds can help promote regularity, prevent constipation and reduce the risk of diabetes. However, flax seeds are also high in arginine and glut-amine. Both of these are important in preventing heart disease and supporting the immune system
  • Flax seed proteins may be useful against fungal infections, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, type 2 diabetes and inflammation Because of their high content of omega-3 fatty acids, flax seeds promote a lower ratio of omega-6 to omega-3. A lower ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids may significantly reduce the risk of various chronic diseases
  • There is one variety that is not as nutritious as regular flax seed, a yellow flax called “solin.” It has a very different oil profile and is low in omega-3 fatty acids

Vitamins and minerals:

  • Vitamin B1: This B-vitamin is also known as thiamine. Vitamin B1 is essential for normal metabolism and nerve function.
  • Copper: An essential mineral that is important for growth, development and various functions in the body
  • Molybdenum: Flax seeds are rich in molybdenum. This essential trace mineral is found in seeds, grains and legumes
  • Magnesium: An important mineral that has many important functions in the body. It is found in high amounts in grains, seeds, nuts and green leafy vegetables
  • Phosphorus: This mineral contributes to bone health and tissue maintenance, and is usually found in protein-rich foods

Phytoestrogens also help lower blood pressure and reduce oxidative stress and inflammation in the arteries

Lignans are fermented by bacteria in the digestive system and may reduce the growth of several cancers, especially hormone-sensitive cancers such as breast, uterus and prostate cancers

Flax seed oil is a source of polyunsaturated fatty acids such as alpha-linolenic acid. The alpha-linolenic acid and related chemicals in flax seed oil seem to decrease inflammation. That is why flax seed oil is thought to be useful for rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory (swelling) diseases.

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